Importance of Natural Resources

What is an estuary?


Welcome to MooMoomath and Science! In this video, I’d like to talk about the ecosystem called the estuary. An estuary is a body of water that has fresh water entering and is also open to the ocean. It is semi-enclosed, coastal body of water, and it’s connected to the open sea, and also, the salt water is diluted when fresh water from land drains into it. Estuaries have been called the “Nurseries of the Sea.” Because they provide a safe environment for fish and birds and other wildlife to raise their young. Estuaries also have producers called Phytoplankton which help the food chain and provide food for many of the wildlife. Estuaries also help because they filter sediment and pollutants from the water before it flows into the ocean. Estuaries are also important because they buffer the Ocean and the land and they can help decrease the effects of flooding and storm surges. Estuaries can be classified according to their geological features: The classifications include coastal plain estuaries, tectonic estuaries bar-built estuaries, and fjords Coastal plain estuaries look like vallow(?) valleys with gentle sloping bottoms. Their depth increases towards the river’s mouth. This type of estuary is common throughout the world. An example is Tampa Bay in the U.S. Bar-built estuaries are formed when sandbars build up along the coastline and they partially cut off the waters behind them from the sea. Fjord estuaries are narrow with steep sides and are usually straight and long. Fjords are found in areas that have been covered by glaciers. And finally tectonic estuaries are created when the sea fills in a hole or basin that’s formed from sinking land San Francisco Bay is a good example So there we go, estuaries the “Nurseries of the World,” places where fresh and saltwater mix together like plants and animals love. Thanks for watching MooMoomath uploads a new math and science video every day, please subscribe and share.


Reader Comments

  1. An estuary is a body of water where fresh and saltwater mix. Learn why they are important and how they are different than other bodies of water.

  2. ecosystem called the estuary an estuary
    is a body of water that has fresh water
    entering and is also open to the ocean
    it is semi enclosed coastal body of
    water and it's connected to the open sea
    and also this salt water is diluted when
    fresh water from land drains into it
    estuaries have been called the nurseries
    of the sea because they provide a safe
    environment for fish and birds and other
    wildlife to raise their young estuaries
    also have producers called phytoplankton
    which help the food chain and provide
    food for many of the wildlife estuaries
    also help because they filter sediment
    and pollutants from the water before it
    flows into the ocean estuaries are also
    important because they buffer the ocean
    and the land and they can help decrease
    the effects of flooding and storm surges
    estuaries can be classified according to
    their geological features the
    classifications include coastal plain
    estuaries tectonic estuaries bar built
    estuaries and fjords coastal plain
    estuaries look like valas valleys with
    gentle sloping bottom their depth
    increases towards the river's mouth
    this type of estuary is common
    throughout the world an example is Tampa
    Bay in the u.s. bar built estuaries are
    formed when sandbars
    build up along the coastline and they
    partially cut off the water's behind
    them from the scene fjord estuaries are
    narrow with steep sides and are usually
    straight and long fjords are found in
    areas that have been covered by glaciers
    and finally tectonic estuaries are
    created when the sea fills in a hole or
    Basin that's formed from sinking land
    San Francisco Bay is a good example so
    there we go
    estuaries the nurseries of the world
    places where fresh and saltwater mix
    together like Quentin animals love

  3. The way the narrator pronounces "s" in the word "estuary" gets so much on my nerves, I can't bear it, honestly. Sort of a childish pronunciation? Pity bec I found the presenattion very informative.

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